Riots took place throughout Urumqi, China on Sunday, July 5 with devastating results.

On Friday, July 10 Chinese authorities announced the official death count as 184 and stated that more than 1,000 people were injured from the violence that shook the city on Sunday. Of the 184 who died, 137 were Han Chinese, 46 were Uighur, and one was part of the Hui Muslim minority group.

The 150 or so pictures released from the police of the dead are mostly made up of Han Chinese and only about 10 of them were of Uighur. The pictures depict the grotesque violence that fell upon the people of the city. Bullet holes near the heart, stab wounds throughout the body, burnt flesh, and swollen faces- these pictures are not for the weak of heart. Some of the bodies were beaten up so badly that nobody could recognize who the body belonged to.

Uighur residents believe that the tallied bodies are inaccurate and that this is the reason why there were only a handful of Uighurs in the released pictures. The Han Chinese (about 90% of China’s population) and the Uighurs are culturally different in every way and have not exactly had the best of relationships. Uighurs feel that government policies are very repressive and that the death count of Uighurs from the riots tally up to the thousands according to the World Uighur Congress. This conclusion is based on family memebers’ and community leaders’ reports of missing persons. Two Han men were not able to find thier missing brother who had been near the scene of the riots. They had searched 23 hospitals in the area and looked through all of the released photos but to no avail, giving credence to the Uighurs’ accusation of hidden bodies.

The pain felt of finding a dead body is as great as not finding it. While searching for their missing brother, the Yu siblings (more specifically Yu Xinqing) found him among the piles of mangled body photos. The graphic image of the body covered in multiple knife wounds and burnt marks set a hatred within Yu that will never be broken. He knows that not all Uighur people are bad but feels that he can never forgive them for what they did to his brother.

The Urumqi government stated that families of innocent people who were killed during the riots will recieve about $29,300 in compensation. By Wednesday, July 8 Chinese troops were able to separate the Han Chinese from the Uighurs, establishing a somewhat but not too wonderful peace between the two groups.

[Source:The Washington Post]
[Images from:Far West China;Telegraph]


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yes....how tragic.


tennislahs - 07/19/09 8:33 am

I dont think a compensation of $29,300 is enough. =[

I agree.


i thought theyd round it but they gave us an actual number, 184


I dont think a compensation of $29,300 is enough. =[


how brutal =[


omg this is so sad D:


that is soo sad and awful...i want to cry reading it
i feel soo bad for those innocent people..they don’t deserve to die! :(


I can’t believe those people! how could you just beat someone to death!? It’s just that theres this much hatetred in the world.


omg what a tradigi


:(
That’s terrible.


That’s very sad…


This is extremely unfortunate. :(


this is so sad i really dont think it had to come to this


What is the point of all this fighting?


proAsian - 07/18/09 11:31 pm

religion is evil!

this has absolutely nothing to do with religion.


At least it’s not another Tienanmen Square…


religion is evil!


That’s sad.


This is so awful T_T



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